William F. Tate

William F. Tate

​Dean of the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences
Vice Provost for Graduate Education
Professor of Education and of African and African-American Studies
Edward Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor in Arts & Sciences
PhD, University of Maryland
    View All People

    contact info:

    mailing address:

    • WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY
      CB 1183
      ONE BROOKINGS DR.
      ST. LOUIS, MO 63130-4899

    As dean of the Graduate School of Arts & Sciences, William F. Tate awards all the master of arts and doctor of philosophy degrees at Washington University. The dean also works closely with the Olin Business School, the School of Engineering & Applied Science, the School of Medicine and the Brown School in supervising doctoral students in these schools’ PhD programs.

    Professor Tate holds or has held other Arts & Sciences academic and research appointments including in Education, African and African-American Studies, American Culture Studies, Center for Applied Statistics and Computation, and Urban Studies. He has served as a member of the executive committee in three of the programs. His other university academic and research endeavors include serving as a participating faculty member in both the Institute for Public Health and Audiology and Communication Sciences program. He also served as a faculty fellow in the Office of the Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs.

    He directs the Center for the Study of Regional Competitiveness in Science and Technology (CSRCST). Center researchers examine the alignment of people, policy instruments, and partnerships as well as other relevant factors associated with regional scientific and technological growth and production. Funding from the National Science Foundation and other agencies has supported the center’s programmatic and research agenda.

    He has authored scores of scholarly journal articles, book chapters, edited volumes, monographs, and textbooks focused on (1) social determinants of science, mathematics, engineering, and technology attainment; (2) epidemiological models and geospatial applications with a focus on adolescent and child developmental outcomes; and (3) social development of youth in the context of urban communities. 

    He is a past president of the American Educational Research Association (AERA).  In 2011, he was awarded fellow status in the Association. He served as an editor of the Association’s American Educational Research Journal (Teaching, Learning, and Human Development Section). Among his research awards and fellowships, he has been an Anna Julia Cooper Fellow at the University of Wisconsin – Madison, a Patricia Roberts Harris Fellow at the University of Maryland at College Park, and the recipient of an Early Career Award (AERA) and Outstanding Scholar Awards (SIG: Research Focus on Black Education and the University of Maryland). In 2010, he received a Presidential Citation from AERA for “his expansive vision of conceptual and methodological tools that can be recruited to address inequities in opportunities to learn.” He has completed post-doctoral training in psychiatric epidemiology in the Department of Psychiatry at the Washington University Medical School. He is a member of For The Sake of All research team, a multi-disciplinary group that is studying the health and well-being of African Americans in St. Louis.

    Selected Publications

    Tate, W. F. [Ed.] (2012).  Research on schools, neighborhoods, and communities: Toward civic responsibility. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield.

    Hogrebe, M. & Tate, W. F.  (2012).  Research and geospatial perspective: Toward a visual political project in education, health, and human services. Review of Research in Education, 36, 67-94.

    Tate, W. F. (2012).  Pandemic preparedness: Using geospatial modeling to inform policy in systems of education and health in metropolitan American. In W. F. Tate [Ed.], Research on schools, neighborhoods, and communities: Toward civic responsibility(pp. 411-430). Lanham MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

    Tate, W. F. & Hogrebe, M. (2011).  From visuals to vision: Using GIS to inform civic dialogue about African American males.  Race Ethnicity and Education, 14(1), 51-71.

    Frierson, H. and Tate, W. F.  (Eds.) (2011).  Beyond stock stories and folktales: African Americans paths to STEM fields.  United Kingdom: Emerald Press.

    Tate, W. F., Anderson, C. R., King, K. [Eds.] (2011).  Disrupting traditionPathways for research and practice in mathematics education.  Reston, Virginia: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

    Artiles, A., Klingner, J. K., Tate, W. F. [Eds.] (2006). Representation of minority students in special education: Complicating traditional explanations, Educational Researcher, 35(6), 3-28.

    Tate, W. F. & D’Ambrosio, B. S. [Eds.] (1997, January). Equity, reform, and research in mathematics education,  Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 28(6), 650-782.

    Tate, W. F. [Ed.] (1996, January). Urban schools and mathematics reform:  Implementing new standards, Urban Education30(4), 379-521.

    Education Research in the Public Interest: Social Justice, Action, and Policy (Multicultural Education Series)

    Education Research in the Public Interest: Social Justice, Action, and Policy (Multicultural Education Series)

    Gloria Ladson-Billings and William F. Tate argue that education scholars can and must undertake work that speaks to the pressing public issues related to education. In this volume, they are joined by renowned educators who have a reputation for engaging public interests and public policy in powerful and provocative ways. Together, they address such important issues as zero-tolerance policies, language-minority students, multicultural education, school reform, teaching for social justice, educational inquiry, curriculum, assessment, and much more. This compelling collection challenges policymakers and the public to take a greater hand in creating a quality education for all students.

    Disrupting Tradition: Research and Practice Pathways in Mathematics Education

    Disrupting Tradition: Research and Practice Pathways in Mathematics Education

    Traditionally, researchers and mathematics education practitioners have been engaged in parallel play, yet they have been segregated by the norms and cultural practices of their distinct institutions and professional reward systems. Rarely do mutually dependent and informing intellectual pathways emerge. This book explores what happens when tradition is disrupted by one purposefully designed research and practice pathway.

    This book offers insights into, and examples of, developing mutually interdependent research and practice processes as part of efforts to improve teacher and leadership capacity, as well as positively influence student learning and related outcomes. This book raises valuable questions for the mathematics education community.

    What forms have research and practice pathways taken?
    What lessons have been learned from collaborations?

    The Crisis of Race in Higher Education: A Day of Discovery and Dialogue Vol: 19

    The Crisis of Race in Higher Education: A Day of Discovery and Dialogue Vol: 19

    The compendium of writings in this edited volume sheds light on the event “Race & Ethnicity: A Day of Discovery and Dialogue” at Washington University in St. Louis and the work current students, faculty, and staff are doing to improve inclusivity on campus and in St. Louis. The book includes speeches, reflections, art, and photography aligned with the Day of Discovery and Dialogue in addition to original academic work on race in higher education, race in St. Louis, and race in the United States. Leading scholars and emerging voices feature in this volume, filling a void in the race and higher education literature since it will foreground a case study of a single university at the epicenter of a national racial crisis and how a university-wide event brought a campus together. This praxis focus may have far reaching impact in aiding other universities across the country in addressing racial tensions in their own communities.

    "Covenant Keeper": Derrick Bell's Enduring Education Legacy

    "Covenant Keeper": Derrick Bell's Enduring Education Legacy

    Although he spent his career as a lawyer and law school professor, Derrick Bell had a profound impact on the field of education in the area of educational equity. Among many accomplishments, Bell was the first African American to earn tenure at the Harvard Law School; he also established a new course in civil rights law and produced what has become a famous casebook: Race, Racism, and American Law. The man who could rightly be called, «The Father of Critical Race Theory,» Bell was an innovator who did things with the law that others had not thought possible. This volume highlights Bell’s influence on a number of prominent education and legal scholars by identifying some of his specific work and how they have used it to inform their own thinking and practice. What is contained here is an assemblage of contributors with deep commitments to the path-breaking work of Derrick Bell – a scholar, a teacher, an activist, a mentor, and a covenant keeper. 

    Research on Schools, Neighborhoods and Communities: Toward Civic Responsibility

    Research on Schools, Neighborhoods and Communities: Toward Civic Responsibility

    Research on Schools, Neighborhoods, and Communities: Toward Civic Responsibility focuses on research and theoretical developments related to the role of geography in education, human development, and health. William F. Tate IV, the Edward Mallinckrodt Distinguished University Professor in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis and former President of the American Educational Research Association, presents a collection of chapters from across disciplines to further understand the strengths of and problems in our communities. Today, many research literatures—e.g., health, housing, transportation, and education—focus on civic progress, yet rarely are there efforts to interrelate these literatures to better understand urgent problems and promising possibilities in education, wherein social context is central. In this volume, social context—in particular, the unequal opportunities that result from geography—is integral to the arguments, analyses, and case studies presented. Written by more than 40 educational scholars from top universities across the nation, the research presented in this volume provides historical, moral, and scientifically based arguments with the potential to inform understandings of civic problems associated with education, youth, and families, and to guide the actions of responsible citizens and institutions dedicated to advancing the public good.

    Beyond Stock Stories and Folktales: African Americans' Paths to STEM Fields (Diversity in Higher Education)

    Beyond Stock Stories and Folktales: African Americans' Paths to STEM Fields (Diversity in Higher Education)

    Ask practically any academic department chair why they do not have more African Americans among faculty members and they generally respond with stock stories or folktales, which stimulated the title of this volume. Stock stories are akin to grand narratives that explain why things are in ways that satisfy those in dominant positions. Frierson and Tate argue it is time to move beyond these. The purpose of the book is to provide historical, conceptual, and empirically-based analyses focused on the development of African Americans in STEM fields. There is rarely any real understanding of the uneven contours of the education pipeline or the transition to academic life experienced in these situations and this volume will shed light on opportunities to advance African American attainment in STEM disciplines throughout the academic and professional spectra, and the mitigation of disparities that continue to be so prevalent. The editors hope that it will generate discussions and actions that are based on empirical evidence and policy analyses, rather than long standing stock stories and folktales that misrepresent the paths linked to African Americans attainment in STEM fields.